Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Learn JavaScript with Code for Teens {A Review}



When we were offered an opportunity to review Code For Teens: The Awesome Beginner's Guide to Programming (Volume 1), my 12-year old son said, "I plan to use it to help me learn code so that I can make games and stuff."  

He was excited for Code for Teens to come in.


Unfortunately, my son's excitement waned once he began using 
Code for Teens, not so much because the book is not engaging nor well-written (It is!), but more because my son wants the mansion before its foundation is built - the glitz before the grunt work.  Learning JavaScript step-by-step with Code for Teens just has not provided enough dopamine for my neuro-diverse son, I guess, but, truly, I think this is more of personal issue, than a reflection on the book.  For honestly, Code for Teens is a wonderful resource!


What is Code for Teens?

Written by a homeschool couple that gets how many teens learn, 
Code for Teens provides an approachable and effective way for teens to dive into coding.  It is written in an informal style that does not condescend, but rather entertains and encourages.  


The 221-page, full-color paperback offers tools, tricks, and a friendly-format to help you self-pace through learning the foundation knowledge needed to understand JavaScript.  


Basic operations and functions, creating loops, and even creating a game become possible as Code for Teens takes you step by step - with humor, plenty of visual examples, and expert guidance - to help you develop coding skills. 

Quizzes, drills, review questions, and simple do-it-yourself projects test your developing knowledge and skills and help you retain what you're learning.  Better still, all this comes at a slow enough pace you to absorb what you are learning instead of buzzing through it and becoming overwhelmed.

A note to parents, an end-of-book glossary, and answers at the back of the book work to make 
Code for Teens even more user-friendly.  You simply open the book, read along and learn, practice what you are learning using Google Chrome, and then check your learning. Color coding on the edge of chapters and color coding within the book itself also make the book easy to use.  (Throughout the book, blue text in gray highlights is what the student enters and red text in gray highlights is what the computer responds with.)


My Son's Thoughts So Far

As a tween who has long said he dreams of working as a coder for a gaming company, I thought my son would devour 
Code for Teens and love making inroads towards the future he claims he seeks.  Instead, when the book came in, he was thrilled and dove in quickly.



However, then, he lost motivation and began complaining by chapter three that the material was pointless and that, "even though the guy (the author) is funny, he does not teach me important things (how to make visual games)."

Ugh!

Like I said at the beginning of this review, my son is simply at a build the castle in the clouds and forget its foundation stage of life.

That said, since, like all my reviews, this one is an honest one, I will share my son's thoughts - which are NOT necessarily what many teens would think.  (Trust me on this and click on over to the many glowing recommendations for 
Code for Teens that other Homeschool Review Crew families are sharing!) 


Find the reviews!


My son said:
I wanted Code for Teens, because I want to make video games and learn how to code. I was expecting the book to teach me how to make multiple games. Instead, it only teaches one game which is not that exciting. It is hangman.

The first chapter taught me how to find out averages using code. Of course, I could use a calculator for that, but now I can do it with code as long as I check things in the book. There are many details.

The second chapter helped me code a team picking thing. There was lots of math in it.  The author had humor in it.

The third chapter drove me nuts. It taught me how to write comments in code in case I want to change something later or trick the computer.  I don't see the point of that, because I could just write things down, and writing comments in the code won't affect the end product.  As I completed this chapter, I got tired of doing it. It was just doing the same things in different ways. I found it boring, except for one joke in the chapter.

Future chapters keep helping me learn to use Javascript, but they only excite me a little. I really want to use Java, not Javascript and I am not that interested in the projects in the book.

Despite this, I am glad I got this book, because it helped me a little.

At the end of the book, the author says he started with this book because he had a new approach to teaching Javascript and wanted to teach it even though it is harder than HTML and CSS.  I wish he had started with those, because they can create pictures and games are not fun without pictures.
 

With my son's thoughts in mind, I would say if you have a "get to the good stuff fast" sort of kids, too, 
Code for Teens might not be the best fit for your child.  However, if you are a beginner coder who seeks a fun, approachable, and expertly crafted way to to build a foundation before reaching higher with other languages, then get this book!  It can help you go from "I know nothing about coding," to look at me learning the real, professional coding painlessly" in no time.

Then, with the hard stuff of the foundation made easy by 
Code for Teens, Volume 1, you can move onto later volumes that teach HTML and CSS.


Learn More


If you'd like to see if Code for Teens would be a good fit for you or your teen, check out a FREE sample!

You can find Code for Teens on Facebook.



Crew Disclaimer

Sunday, July 15, 2018

An Open Letter to You, Pro-Life Man

Dear Pro-Life Man,

Twice this weekend, I heard comments about why men should stay out of discussions about abortions, and both times, the remarks were made by blatantly rude women who spoke with much scathing accusation, but little sense.


Amidst their vulgar language, these women claimed you have no right to speak out against abortion simply because you are a man.

How ridiculous it that?

As a man you might suffer over the loss of a child, yet you may not speak about the heinous act that takes approximately 3,000 lives in the U.S.A. alone each day and about 125,000 lives worldwide.  No, Sir, your hurt does not count claim some women.  You have no womb, so you can have no wound.  Abortion is none of your business.

And, lo, Man, if you are the father of a child conceived without forethought, do not stop and think even for a moment. You may have shared in the creation of that life, but you have no say over what will happen to it.  Yes, yes, forget about being encouraged to invest in that child, share in responsibility, and care for the child and mother.  You. have. no. say.  Whatever the mother wants, goes.  The child may live or die.  It is not up to you.  Be quiet.  


Be quiet, that is, unless you want to speak out for the death of unwanted children.  If you want to join the chorus of men lauding the choice to kill babies, have at it.  Be loud.  Be proud.  Man up and be Bro-Choice.

Indeed, dear Man, you must only lock your lips if you want to speak out against abortion, some women say.


Oh, and while you are speaking, please dare you not be chivalrous, protecting the innocent and standing up for the weak and oppressed.

Because you cannot get pregnant, you cannot understand things, and you must not respect, nor protect, life.  Got it, Man?

Oh, my dear, Pro-Life Man, I am so glad you are able to ignore such fallacious, illogical viewpoints.  Indeed, I am so glad you have the courage to speak truth even in the face of misguided accusations from women who claim you are a misogynist, an insensitive brute, an idiot, or worse. 

I assure you, Man-Who-Speaks-Out-Against-Abortion, that not all of us women scorn you. Many of us applaud you.  Many of us thank you.


In fact, I, personally, thank you for speaking out against abortion.  I thank you for letting you voice be heard and being the voice for those who can not cry out from the wombs of women who want them silenced. 

I thank you for ignoring the ignorant demand of women who say that you have no place in discussions about abortion, since you cannot get pregnant, cannot have an abortion, cannot understand what a woman goes through, and, therefore should not speak your thoughts. Indeed, I thank you, kind Pro-Life Sir, for standing firm with women like me who recognize you just might have a part in the conception of a child and you might wonder how that child's life might change yours... You might, indeed, go through much.  For male or female, you are human.  You are alive.  And you have every right to speak.

So, thank you, dear Pro-Life man, for exercising your right.  I welcome your voice in the conversation and am heartily grateful that you unabashedly support truth and life.

Speak on, Pro-Life Man. Take every opportunity you can to defend life from conception to natural death.  Do not be shouted down.  Do no be silenced.  Do not fall into the misconception that abortion is a women's right's issue.  Keep recognizing it as what is truly is: a human rights issue.

Unborn children are human beings and you have every right to defend the life of a fellow human being.

Pro-Life Man, I apologize for the loud, lacking in love voices of some of my fellow women who seek to shame you into silence, and I remind you, then in matters like these, there is no shame but that of silence.

We cannot stay quiet.  We must speak for those who cannot. Your voice is powerful.  Keep using it.

Stand together with other men and women - and me - who seek to respect and protect life, building a better future - one where all human beings may have the right to life!

With deepest gratitude and endless encouragement, I thank you, Pro-Life Man.

May love sound!

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Are You Looking for an All-in-One Math Refresher? {A Review}

If you or your older children need to brush up on your Math skills, I recommend that you take a look at Math Refresher for Adults from Math Essentials



Math Refresher for Adults is a clear, concise, and helpful resource that takes you grade four math topics all the way through Algebra in a mere 270 pages with helpful lesson videos accessible online if you need them.



As the cover of the book indicates, Math Refresher for Adults is written with a number of people in mind, including those who:


  • have a math phobia and want to overcome it.
  • want to be able to help children with homework or homeschool work.
  • are re-entering the workforce and need to brush up on math skills.
  • are preparing for math placement tests for college.
  • are applying for jobs that require math competency tests.
  • are entering a medical or tech field.

In other words, the book is helpful for any teen or adult that struggles with foundational math or wants a refresher course in order to improve problem-solving skills and data analysis.  

Why Math Refresher for Adults Works


Like many skills, Math skills tend to be ones that you either use or lose.  Thus, many of us get rusty on math skills that we don't use often and, then, find ourselves needing to refresh them in order to complete a work task, help our children, or solve a problem that has come up in life.  Math Refresher for Adults can help with all of that, as it is an easy-to-use tool that covers all the practical math you'll need through Algebra.

Lessons in Math Refresher for Adults start with a review of basic addition of whole numbers through the hundreths place and then move on through subtraction, multiplication, and division, before getting into fractions, decimals, percents, geometry, integers, charts and graphs, and word problems.  Finally, you review Pre-Algebra and Algebra.

Each lesson is printed clearly and concisely on a consumable page that begins with a small box for notes, which you may wish to use for notes as you watch free video lessons accessible online.

Next to the note box are typically 3-6 review exercises, which can help you discover "holes" in your math skills that you might want to flip back in the book to practice and "fill".

Then, there is a Helpful Hints box to jog your memory with tips about how to do the target problems which follow.

After the Helpful Hints are typically two sample problems and 10 exercises that target a specific topic of math.  You can work these out in the consumable book or you can use notebook paper if you prefer or think you may need extra space.  (Do note, however, you may not photocopy the pages.)




There are spaces next to the exercises in which you can record your answers, and answers, in turn, can be checked with the Solutions in the back of the book.



Finally,  at the bottom of each lesson page is a word problem, so you can apply your Problem Solving skills.

The book also contains a Glossary, a list of Important Symbols, Tables for multiplication, commonly used prime numbers, squares and square roots, and fraction/decimal equivalents at the back. 

At the front are tip pages which are helpful and tell you how to access lesson videos taught by Richard W. Fisher, Winner of Intel Innovations in teaching Award and a man who truly seems to love math and want to make it accessible to others in the easiest and most expedient way possible.

Using the Book

When we decided to review Math Refresher for Adults, my husband was wanting to brush up on his math skills. So, we got the book with him in mind. 

Then, he ended up getting a new job and, thus, has been focused on that and has only used the book a bit, liking what he has tackled in it so far.

I have also been using the book just to test my own math skills - doing random pages when I have a few minutes here and there and realizing I have a better understanding of math than I sometimes give myself credit for (because I am more a dramatic arts and English type).  However, I have also recognized I make some careless mistakes - which gives me empathy for my children when they do the same!



I keep the book on our math shelf so that if my oldest, who is the only one of my children doing math beyond a 4th grade level at the moment, needs help with anything I am unable to help him with, I can easily grab Math Refresher for Adults, look up the skill, and refresh my own knowledge of it before helping my son.

Math Refresher for Adults has not failed us yet and I cannot see it doing so.  I recommend the book and accompanying videos present an easy-to-understand,  no frills, no-fluff way to get your math up to speed through Algebra




If you want a full refresher in math, you can progress through the book in order in, I'd say, in 15' or more a day.  Or, if you need to brush up on a specific skill, you can use the detailed Table of Contents to find the targeted skill, then, turn to the appropriate lesson page, try it out, watch the video if need to (which is typically under 10 minutes long), and refresh your skills.

The end result is that your math skills will be strengthened whether you just want to get batter at math or whether you need to in order to help your child, take a test, or complete work tasks.

I appreciate the simplicity and effective, direct style of the Math Refresher for Adults and believe it can be an important go-to resource for anyone who needs to strengthen or review math from a fourth grade level through Algebra!

Learn More



Get social with Math Essentials on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/math.essentials/
Read the reviews.

Seventy-five Homeschool Review Crew families tried out 
Math Refresher for Adults, so you can get lots of opinions on the effectiveness of the book.

Another Effective Resource

Our family previously reviewed
No-Nonsense Algebra, which is also by Math Essentials and uses the same easy and effective style as this book.  So, if you're looking for an Algebra book, check that out.


Crew Disclaimer

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Bible Study for the Whole Family {A Review}


If you've been wanting to focus more on timelines, mapping, and the Bible in your homeschool, co-op, church, or classroom endeavors, then the Bible Study Guide For All Ages is worth looking into.  
Our family has been working our way through the Intermediate (3rd & 4th grade)
 and Advanced (5th & 6th grade) and, so far, I am impressed.


Homeschool Bible Lessons with Something for Everyone

The Bible Study Guide For All Ages is a multi-faceted resource that aims to take folks of all ages through the entire Bible at the same time over the course of four years.  The program helps you learn the "big picture" of the story of the Bible while also sharpening your knowledge of Bible details.  It also challenges you to think about how to apply Bible teaching to your own life.

The full course has 416 lessons offered at levels for ages 3-K, grades 1-2, grades 3-4, grades 5-6, teens, and adults.  Each level has its own student pages, but the lessons in all levels study the same Scripture at the same time.  That way, your whole family can study the Bible together - with each person using age-appropriate student pages - and, when a child outgrows one level, the child can simply move onto the next lesson in the next level.  This makes the program fabulous for multi-age families!

The program also offers components besides the student pages, including CD's, Bible Book Summary Cards, Wall Maps and a Time Line and more.  That means, there is something for everyone - auditory, kinesthetic, and visual learners of all ages!

Further, the program can be used no matter what Christian denomination you are, for as the creator of the program says:

"We are sometimes asked if we are owned or controlled by a particular denomination or if we teach various church doctrines. We work independently of any church group or denomination and make no attempt to teach our opinion about issues of debate. Our goal is to present the Bible and the Bible alone. We believe that it is through the prayerful study of God’s word that people come to a true and lasting faith."


So far, I have seen this to be true - the program seems to stick to the Bible alone.  (My children and I did note that it does not contain anything for deuterocanonical books - the Tobit, Judith, 1 and 2 Maccabees, Wisdom, Ecclesiasticus, and Baruch- which are a part of our Catholic Bible.

Easy to Tailor to Your Family's Needs

For this review, we received:


  •  a set of the Large Bible Book Summary Cards: full page, glossy card stock cards that have full-color illustrations on one side and questions and answers on the other to help you get the big picture of the Bible.  (These were my favorite part of the program!)


  • Intermediate Student Pages through Lesson 26: These are legal paper sized black-and-white student pages that are bound quite loosely (for easy tear-out, I suppose.)  They include Bible drills, review games, timeline and map drills, application activities and more and are written so a child can guide themselves through the pages or work with a parent or teacher on them. You can view samples of them here


  • Advanced Student Pages through Lesson 26: These are similar to the intermediate pages, but, of course, are a little more challenging. They include interactive, illustrated Bible study, Bible and memory drills, timeline, maps, application activities, and more.  You can view sample pages of these, too.


  • an Advanced Teacher Key through lesson 26:  These are a companion to the Student Pages and provide additional teaching aids such as definitions of Bible words, background information, instructions for placing labels in the Unlabeled Wall Maps and Time Lines, etc.  The Student Pages may be used with or without this key.  To decide if you'd find it helpful, you can view sample pages.


  • a Wall Map & Time Line Label Book: This small 3-ring binder contains keys to where labels go as well as all the labels needed for the first 104 lessons.  The labels are in full color and made of sturdy glossy cardstock.  You cut them out yourself and attach them to the Wall Maps and Time Line using adhesive putty.


  • Wall Map & Time Line: These are blank maps and timelines that help you see where Bible events took place and how all the stories of the Bible fit together over time. The size of the Time Line is 76" x 25". The sizes of the three maps are 38" x 25", 19" x 25" and 19" x 25".  (This is what drew me into the program.  I have been wanting to focus more on time lines and mapping and these make doing so handy!)


Of course, then, the first thing we did when starting to use all this was put up our Time Line and Wall Maps and begin cutting out the labels.  I, personally, do not love having to keep track of lots of little pieces, but my daughter enjoys cutting, placing labels, etc. and said, "The Time Line is my favorite part of the program!"



Then, we sat down together with the Student Pages, Summary Cards, and our Bibles and began with Lesson 1.  My children were a little confused at first because I had them at two different levels and so their pages were different.  Then, once they realized we had different level Student Pages, my youngest wanted to try the Advanced level.  I let him, but, he quickly decided the Intermediate Level was for him, and stated, "The whole Intermediate Level because it is easier and I like the activities!"




My oldest son liked the Advanced Level best and said, "I liked that I could move ahead with it, and, then, do something else while you guys caught up."  And, yes, this is what happened - proving the Student Pages can be used independently and do not require the Teacher Key.




Due to the nuero-diversity of my children and our life schedule, we tend to do particular family lessons for only 15-20 minutes in a sitting, and my oldest tends to get distracted easily.  So, he either spent time going ahead of his siblings and I a bit or racing through a portion of the program and then reading or writing his own stuff until we were ready to move onto group use of the Wall Maps, Time Line, and Summary.  This worked for us.

The fact that the curriculum is written with two pages per lesson, but many small sub-lesson bits worked, too.  In 15-20 minutes, we could not, of course, get through an entire lesson, but,
because of the way the program is written, we could easily find a logical breaking point, and, then, pick right back up with lessons the next time we sat down together.



As a family, we found the Bible Study Guide For All Ages easy to adapt to our schedules, learning styles, and needs and will definitely be using it in rotation with our other faith studies as time continues.  This means it might take us far more than a 1/4 year to complete the Quarter 1 materials we have, but, that's okay with us.  We are relaxed and eclectic.  For those that are more structured, using the materials 2-3 times a week for longer than 15-20 minutes at a sitting, you could certainly work through 1/4 of the Bible in a year, and the full Bible over four years.

We can recommend Bible Study Guide For All Ages for those who wish to combine Bible geography, history(time line) and Bible studies (but will add the caveat for fellow Catholics that not all the books of the Bible are included and, also, we have yet to see what every lesson is like, so would recommend families work together so that if the odd theology question comes up, it can be dealt with right away.  I do not foresee this happening since so far we've found the program truly does just stick to the Word, not interpretations of it.  However, I would feel remiss not mentioning to fellow Catholics that I have not yet read every lesson and, therefore, cannot speak to the entire 4-year program.  I like what I have done so far!)

Learn More


Find all the reviews.


Want different points of view?  Seventy Homeschool Review Crew families tested out different levels of the Bible Study Guide For All Ages.

Find the Bible Study Guide for All Ages on Facebook and Twitter.

Sunday, July 8, 2018

When Christ Consoles through A Child and a Liturgical Shelf



Have you ever had a day when you're just emotionally off?  You know, the kind of day when someone seems to have turned the faucets in your eyes onto "leak at a moment's notice"? 

I had just that sort of day the other day, and, oddly, our July liturgical shelf  helped move me from sadness to smiles.





At one point during my "off" day, my daughter noticed silent tears slipping from my eyes and came to give me a concerned hug.  I thanked her and reassured her that nothing had happened to anyone, that I was not sad nor angry with her or her brothers, and that Mommy just woke with many emotions and needed to release them.

My daughter accepted that, gave me another hug, and, then, sat down quietly next to me, where she sang happily in an attempt, I am sure, to keep her empathetic self cheerful and to cheer me as well. 

A moment later, my daughter glanced at our July liturgical shelf, called to her brothers, and asked them to help her.  






Together, they began praying An Offering of the Precious Blood for Souls.  I joined them through my tears, and, as they each took a small, tear-shaped piece of tissue paper "blood" to place in the chalice at Jesus' feet, a grateful smile caught a tear that slipped down my cheek.





Christ offered such a sacrifice for all of us and continually offers each us consolation... mercy... hope.

Following Him, we can offer up our own struggles, no matter what they are.

I know this, of course, but, while stewing in my sadness the other day, I had forgotten to turn my sorrow into something beautiful and worthwhile by offering it up.

Then, Christ sent my children to remind me.

Little did I know a few days prior when my children and I had put together our simple July liturgical shelf as a way of teaching them about our faith that it would become a vehicle for Christ to reach me during a moment of sadness.

He truly works in wonderful ways.

I pray His ways reach you during your next moment of sadness, too.

Sunday, July 1, 2018

Planning Our July Liturgical Shelf

July 1?  How is it already July first? 

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel and Precious Blood of Jesus


I am not sure how the second half of this calendar year is upon us already.  I am also not sure how so many months have passed since my family has properly set up our liturgical shelf with one of our Marian peg dolls 
and items to help focus us on the monthly devotion.

Thus, as I head to bed tonight, I am brainstorming how my children and I might decorate our liturgical shelf this week.  I thought I would share my thoughts in case you, too, would like to prepare a liturgical shelf, feast table, prayer corner, or home altar space, too.

Since July is the Month of the Precious Blood, we will layer our shelf with a white cloth atop a red runner cloth.  From a symbolic point of view, the red cloth, of course, will remind us of the Precious Blood of Jesus,while the white will remind us of His pure love for us.

From a more practical standpoint, the white cloth will allow red cardstock cut into tear-shaped droplets to be visible, since the children and I will be making these to use a la a simple, yet beautiful idea shared by Anne at Under Her Starry Mantle.

The droplets will radiate out from one corner o the shelf, where we will place a chalice under a statue of Jesus as Anne did or a crucifix as Jennifer from Wildflowers and Marbles didRed cloth will run from the statue or crucifix to the chalice, symbolic of the Precious Blood.

We will also place this prayer on a stand:

An
Offering
Of the Precious
Blood for Souls

O my God, I beg of Thee in
union with the Immaculate Heart
of Mary, through the merits of the
Precious Blood offered Thee in every
Sacrifice of the Mass throughout the world,
to grant that this day one mortal sin may be
averted, one soul in doubt may be converted to
the truth, one soul about to die in sin may receive
the grace of repentance and a happy death, and
the deliverance of that soul in purgatory which is
nearest Heaven. I wish by this offering to console
the Heart Of Jesus in agony for the souls lost
through the Teaching of error against the
true Church of Christ Jesus,
Our Lord. Amen



At the other corner of our shelf, we will place our Our Lady of Mt. Carmel peg doll.



Near the doll, will go a brown scapular and a copy of
the Brown Scapular Coloring Book, which, I hope, we will end up re-reading together throughout the month.

Image: Amazon


If I can find where I last placed them, we will also out our copies of Garment of Grace...

Image: Amazon



... and Garment of Grace (children's version)

Image: Amazon



I would love to hear your favorite prayers, images, and book titles for the Month of the Precious Blood and Our lady of Mt. Carmel.

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Art History from a Christian Perspective {A Review}



{This post contains affiliate links to a vendor we have been enjoying:The Master and His Apprentices.}


Are you looking for a faith-connected homeschool art history curriculum

The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective created by The Master and His Apprentices might be just what you are looking for.

The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective would work well for:



  • adults who want to read about art appreciation with a Biblical worldview.
  • parents who to better understand art history in order to teach their children about it, or who are looking for specifically Christian material to supplement other art, history, and faith studies.
  • high school students that desire a full credit art history course that can be used independently, with a co-op, or with a private school.
  • artists who desire to better understand what makes art great.


The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective is particularly wonderful for Christian families because it eliminates some of the problems of secular art history curricula which present materials from a humanistic perspective, failing to view God as the original, ultimate Creator, make no connections between art, artists, and Biblical timelines, and do not present Jesus' life, death, and resurrection as truth, but rather as a myth.  In other words, 
The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective  focuses on what is true and beautiful, leaving out what is questionable!



What Is Included in This Homeschool Art History Curriculum


The Master and His Apprentices

The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective is a 380-page textbook course with a teacher guide that was written by a former homeschool student, Gena Ferguson, who has been teaching art, English, history and the Bible for over 12 years. Gena used her experience to create a comprehensive Art History course aimed at Christian highschoolers that provides a full credit of Art History when used with the materials from the teacher guide. 

Of course, Gena also made the book friendly for whole families that want to browse beautiful art or learn more about how art fits in with faith and history, ince she specifically designed 
The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective as a resource:


  • that contains no nudity nor material that may be objectionable to most Christian families.
  • helps readers create a "visual" timeline of Biblical and world events.
  • includes beautiful images.
  • has helpful materials to help families talk about art and know where to find specific art pieces.


The curriculum covers art all the way from Mesopotamia to today and contains over 600 photos, detailed timelines, and a plethora of information about major time periods, artists, styles, mediums, and techniques.

Sculpture, painting, architecture, and more are included.


The text helps students "see" history by connecting art, history, and the Bible while it dives into such periods as:


  • Ancient Cultures: Ancient Near East, Egyptian and Aegean
  • Classical Antiquity: Early Greek, Etruscan and Roman
  • Middle Ages: Medieval & Islamic, Early Christian & Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic
  • Renaissance: Proto-Renaissance, Early and High Italian Renaissance and Northern Renaissance
  • Baroque and Beyond: Baroque, Rococo to Today (modern art) and Global Highlights (non-Western art)



The book covers all periods of art.

Each chapter of the text typically begins with an introduction that gives important background information about a period.  Then, you are introduces to art and artists from the period through text, inviting images, helpful timelines, etc.

Throughout the book you will learn about a variety of mediums from painting, to sculpture, to architecture, and, of course, will be able to make connections between these works, the periods of history they were created in, and the influence of faith on it all.



In the teacher guide you will find:


  • weekly worksheets for self study 
  • discussion questions for classroom settings
  • 4 exams
  • instructions for 4 papers
  • a grading chart
  • answer keys
  • a syllabus

I browsed these and used some mentally for my own learning and look forward to using them "as intended" with my children when they are a bit older and ready to take the credit course.  


I can definitely see how the text provides plenty of "meat" and engagement and the materials in the teacher guide provide the tools for "chewing" on the meat, learning independently with minimal planning or guidance from a parent-teacher or, if preferred, learning through dynamic parent-child or classroom discussions.  That makes 
The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective flexible to different homeschool styles: independent learners can use the materials as written, families and co-ops can mix and match written and oral work alongside reading and viewing the text, and those that prefer to dip into curriculum as a resource rather than a start-to-finish thing can easily do.


How We've Been Using This Homeschool Art History Resource



When I was offered the chance to review this Christian art history program I was excited.  As anyone who has been following our family's homeschool journey for any length of time knows, we are history lovers who also like art and enjoy integrating faith into our studies and fun.  Thus, I thought The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective might be an ideal resource for my children and I to read together as well as a lovely book to browse and use in connection to our eclectic studies.

Unfortunately, I was wrong about the The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective working for us a read aloud.  For, when I sat down to read a digital copy of the book with my children (who are between seven and twelve years of age), it just did not hold their attention.  They found it too difficult  to all enjoy the pictures together on our small laptop screen and felt that the text, although well-written, was just not quite right for snuggly reading time.  Thus, we decided to read our digital copy of the text individually when they get a bit older and, instead of reading it together now as a consecutive read together study, to have me use it as a resource for prepping our current lessons and clubs and for learning myself.

This portion of the book was helpful when I was preparing recent club activities.


This decided, The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective has worked well for us as a ready resource for preparing the art portion of future Art, Music, and Poetry club lessons as well as for me to learn more about art history.  The kids have also enjoyed clicking through its pages on our computer to see the beautiful artwork they include.

Oh, and can I just say, I appreciate so much the way 
The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective presents timelines that make placing art in history - including Biblical history - easy!

Further, I love the fact that it includes:



  • a list of the Pieces by Location (which tells where each piece pictured in the book can be viewed around the world)
  • explanations of terms to describe art (which are so helpful for this art appreciating mama that leads Art, Poetry, and Music club but lacks a formal background in art myself)
  • and, a full listing of Consulted Resources that tells where each photograph, drawing, and map in the book came from.


Such lists make the book even more user-friendly!

Timelines throughout the book help us place art, history, and the Bible together.

So, obviously, we are happy to have received The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective and have been finding it interesting and helpful.

We all agree that, as a family resource, The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective would be better to own in a printed and bound version that would allow us to cuddle up together and pour over.  However, we also have noted how well the digital version we have works as a resource for self-study, research, and review, especially since we can quickly search terms, artist names, artist periods, etc. and ge right to the sections of the book which include them!


Learn More 

If you'd like to learn more about The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective, click on over to see what seventy Homeschool Review Crew families thought of the curriculum.


You can also find The Master and His Apprentices on social media on Facebook and Pinterest.



TMAHA_textbook_open.jpg

The Master and His Apprentices: Art History from a Christian Perspective textbook is available in hardcover for $149.99, digitally for $34.99. A softcover teacher guide is available for $24.99 or digitally for $19.99 with photocopy or print right available at a $2 per additional student rate.



We'd love to hear how The Master and His Apprentices works for you and yours if you choose to use it!



LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails